Gardai Should Be Held Accountable

Posted on March 2, 2010

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There hasn’t been a rant on this page in a while. And thankfully, given the subject matter of this post, I don’t think there will be. Readers, please understand that I mean no offence to anyone in what I write here. If any is interpreted I apologise in advance but I have tried to keep my political incorrectness out of this as much as possible.

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If I have succeeded, you may see this letter in The Irish Independent tomorrow or the next day. If I haven’t then this will be confined to the corner of this blog but I’ll be ok with that.

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Dear Sir/Madam,

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In the midst of all the speculation and deliberation over the news that local people may be asked to contribute towards clerical abuse victims’ compensation, I found myself considering another matter completely.

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It’s perhaps not unreasonable to think that the people may be asked to contribute towards the compensation – it could be argued, after all, that the society in which these monstrosities happened, was created by us, and our inability to see what was going on right in front of our eyes.

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What I don’t find reasonable is the glaringly obvious lack of blame. I wonder, how many abuse victims reported the crimes against them to the Gardai? I wonder how many of these crimes were ignored?

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But perhaps even more importantly, I wonder how many of these crimes were brought to superintendents or those in the higher echelons of the Gardai, where they were then waved away; sweeping what should have been a criminal investigation under the carpet of Church-State relations?

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The local people of this country are already being asked to pay so much: pensions, which aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on; banks which are so unstable that you might as well be paying into a sunscreen factory in Limerick, and so much more.

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Why don’t those in the upper echelons of the Gardai, those who were responsible for downright refusing to investigate criminal activity, which after-all is what we pay them to do, pay towards the compensation fund? I don’t mean in the same light as us, but I mean substantially. Because in essence, what these men did, was just as inexcusable as the acts of abuse themselves, and perhaps even more so because they could have stopped it. Money is perhaps not really the issue in something which weighs so much heavier on morals than anything else but the fact is that these people were paying the wages of public servants who did nothing to help them when they needed help.

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Why are these people not being held accountable?

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Regards,

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Anna Hayes

Co. Wexford.

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